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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to replace my clockspring and want to do the key cylinder at the same time as it is acting up. Rock Auto lists a number of different Motorcraft ones, such as "number 3, cut letter D" etc. Which one do I need?

Thanks and yes I did search.
 

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The lock cylinders are all the same. I believe the cut letter has to with the key or the key code, used to match the ignition key with your door lock cylinders, the ignition switch and doors are the same key.
The letter is a code of the depth of the key code, Its kind of complicated and I'm not very familiar with it.
Someone will prolly be along to help explain better.

Ford dealers used to be able to help with this
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply. I was hoping for a more definitive reply, but I'll take a stab at it. Thanks again.
 

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If you don't mind having a separate key for ignition and doors don't worry bout the cut codes.
If you are wanting the keys to match then you will have to research what code your truck is, start with your Ford dealer, they will need the VIN.
No one can really tell you outright which one you need, thats where the "code" part comes in
 

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I don't know about you guys but my local Ford dealer told me they don't keep anything on hand for vehicles older than 15 years when I asked about the key code/getting keys for my '93. They may have just been lazy turds but they told me to not bother asking for any help from them.
 

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I don't know about you guys but my local Ford dealer told me they don't keep anything on hand for vehicles older than 15 years when I asked about the key code/getting keys for my '93. They may have just been lazy turds but they told me to not bother asking for any help from them.
They are not lazy turds, there is just no reason for them to keep 20+ year old codes, for a handful of people that might need them.
 

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Their official excuse was that when they switched to a computer system Ford provided rather than physical manuals and books Ford didn't bother to include data going back that far and they had thrown out all their hard copies.
 

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That sounds like a logical reason. I wouldn't keep the shit either, especially if I had to pay money for the transfer.

Hell my own parts catalog doesn't go back past 1983 for fluid capacities. Why would they upload and research that data? Most of the shit from 33 years ago is long dead and gone.
 

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In order to get the correct service ignition from Rock Auto (or any other supplier), they need either 1) the original key code or 2) your key needs to be decoded.

Since you don't have, and can't get, the original key code, yours would need to be decoded. That's not something that can be answered here without seeing the key, and most don't like to share their key on a public forum. I've decoded a few from pictures but it has it's challenges and risks due to age, wear and crappy reproduced keys. Best to let a locksmith decode your key and back into it. Again, even with a "live" key there can be issues with interpretation. They started phasing that system out about 20 years ago, so not everyone has parts 'n stuff around or is schooled in their service. If you want help and are comfortable with it, you could PM me a pick of your key and I can try to decode it for you.

The dealer isn't messing with you. Most large dealers don't keep sales records around (where your code would be found), and for one that old it would have to be the selling dealer anyway. Some of the smaller dealers might, but it's a long shot.

Did you check your owner's manual? Sometimes PO write it in there.
 

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I did the Rockauto key cylinder and it works great for over a year now. Doesn't bother me dealing with separate keys. I also hardly have to use the door key as I have an alarm I just push a button to unlock. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks so much..I did take the key to a locksmith, but the lady didn't know what I meant when I said it had a code. I'll go back when her husband is there. And Steve, I will do that if this doesn't work. Thank you all.
 

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Thanks so much..I did take the key to a locksmith, but the lady didn't know what I meant when I said it had a code. I'll go back when her husband is there. And Steve, I will do that if this doesn't work. Thank you all.
She should have, even if you phrased it differently than she's used to. Maybe they don't do that much automotive work(?) She may not be familiar with the older Ford 10 system, but she still should know what you meant.

Most (99%) automotive locks/keys have a "key code" when created. It's not imperative that you have the original code from Ford. My suggestion is/was based on the fact that if you have to go to a locksmith to get part of it decoded, you might just as well get it all decoded. That requires the locksmith to all determine the cuts and back into the code. I have a list of sorted codes I created just for that purpose. Having the cuts will help with what you need. Technically, having just the 5th cut will provide you the critical info. That's what you need to order the service ignition. Even after you get the correct service ignition, you will still need to go to a locksmith to get some of the cuts transferred to the new key....if you only want to carry one key.

You didn't describe what kind of problem you are having with it. I like to clean Ford locks with either electrical tuner cleaner or brake parts cleaner. Spray in a liberal amount, then blow it out with compressed air. After it's clean I like to use dry graphite. Usually it's in a squeeze tube and comes out in a "dust". If you use it, don't use a lot. Anything more than that, I recommend replacing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
She should have, even if you phrased it differently than she's used to. Maybe they don't do that much automotive work(?) She may not be familiar with the older Ford 10 system, but she still should know what you meant.

Most (99%) automotive locks/keys have a "key code" when created. It's not imperative that you have the original code from Ford. My suggestion is/was based on the fact that if you have to go to a locksmith to get part of it decoded, you might just as well get it all decoded. That requires the locksmith to all determine the cuts and back into the code. I have a list of sorted codes I created just for that purpose. Having the cuts will help with what you need. Technically, having just the 5th cut will provide you the critical info. That's what you need to order the service ignition. Even after you get the correct service ignition, you will still need to go to a locksmith to get some of the cuts transferred to the new key....if you only want to carry one key.

You didn't describe what kind of problem you are having with it. I like to clean Ford locks with either electrical tuner cleaner or brake parts cleaner. Spray in a liberal amount, then blow it out with compressed air. After it's clean I like to use dry graphite. Usually it's in a squeeze tube and comes out in a "dust". If you use it, don't use a lot. Anything more than that, I recommend replacing it.

The chime will stay on, key can be removed while running and the tumblers don't line up anymore, which can make it difficult to start for someone who doesn't know what to do.
 

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I've seen a really simple tool for reading the cut numbers from a key, but I haven't been able to FIND one that I can buy. I realize that some locksmith tools are protected (even restricted in some states, but not TN), but this one isn't going to open any locks. Do you know where I can get one?
Short answer is no.
The long answer is....(and why you probably haven't been able to find one).... Reasons being:

1) (overall) While it isn't restricted, most in the industry keep their equipment (tools, techniques etc) close to the vest and don't share well, and breathing locksmiths rarely sell anything....when they do, it's generally to other locksmiths.

2) Most tools get passed down, or sold to other locksmiths when they die or close shop. Pieces like that (generally) just wouldn't get sold separately. (tedious)

3) Those were part of a set, and part of a key cutting system. They were available individually, but you had to be established with the mfg/distributor.
They didn't sell that many of them that way.

4) .....also, don't forget that stuff is 20-30 years old. ...probably flopping around in some old locksmith's van.

BUT....
Probably as important as 1-4 - having one of those doesn't guarantee success and accuracy. Figure many of the keys are 3rd, 4th, 5th generation and/or cut by kids at hardware/dime stores on machines that rarely get adjusted...so what you are trying to decode may very well be off and open for interpretation.
 

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i used a 12 dollar ebay key and cylinder. i kept the original as a door key.
 
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