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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all -

I want to replace my old Master Cylinder. What are my options, other than going down to NAPA and picking up a new or reman. replacement?

I have a 1983 Bronco with the I6, and it's stock. I just put 31x10.5 on it, so big tires aren't part of the equation.


My brakes are at times, squishy when applied. I was told by a reliable source that the MC was 9 out of 10 times the culprit. I also would like to change the brake lines - at least replacing them if not upgrading to stainless.


As always, I appreciate your comments. Thank you all!
 

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well you could go down to napa and get the replacement mc but get the one for the 1 ton (f350 truck)it has a bigger bore and should help with the braking, another thing that could make your brakes is a vacum leak or bad vacum resivor ( sorry spelling [email protected]#ks)
 

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If you were going to do that you might as well do the 1 ton booster as well.

I dont think thats the route he is wanting to go though. I would get a good stock MC and some good stainless lines. That should have you set up pretty good.
 

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88 CdA bronc:
How old is the MC?

What shape are your brake pads/shoes in overall?

Usually when the pedal fads or is mushy it could be a sign the MC is going or it could mean the system wasn't bled properly or the MC wasn't BENCH BLED prior to installation leaving too much air in the system, it's a common mistake because the MFG doesn't always bench bleed so it's up to you to do it or check. They have R&R MC kits or if need, replace but make sure you BB the new one, find proceedure in the Haynes.

It could aslo mean the rubber flex lines are old and possibly expanding too much, so do a visual on those.

I would do visual inspection of the pads/shoes calipers and wheel cylinders try to bleed the system first, it doesn't cost anything but time. Don't forget to adjust the rear brakes ~

Brake Booster could be going as well, check for leaks around where the MC mates up to it ~

If the metal brake lines are in good condition and no damage, why do you need to replace them $$$, I'm not clear on that?

Just try to diagnose first, use the Haynes for reference before you start blowing money etc.

Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 

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My master cylinder use to leak like crazy. My rear brakes were basically non-existent so I don't know whether the upgrade works better than a new stock replacement but I did the F350 booster, M/C and wheel cylinders and everything works great now. Extremely easy install. The hardest part was cutting off one of the fittings for the M/C and replacing it (had to learn to cut and double flare tubing...not hard). That or bench bleeding, it isn't hard it's just time consuming. It's amazing how much fluid goes down into the chambers.

Edit: Oh I also completely flushed my brake lines while i was at it. All new fluid, majority of new parts and new shoes probably helped a lot from completely useless rear brakes...
 

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The brake fluid will break down a lot because of the heat generated in the front to stop, heating up those calipers and brake lines so flushing out the old with new isn't a bad idea.

:thumbup
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Rlevs -
Re: the 1 ton MC, would I also need to plumb in a proportioning valve, or would that be only for a disk upgrade to the rear?

JKossarides -
Not sure how old it is, but I'm assuming it's original. I still need to inspect the front and rear brakes, but was planning on doing a total rotor/pad Xchange and atleast the shoes in the rear. My lines are rubber and are pretty hashed, to say the least. (I'm a recovering Jeepaholic and) I know the SS lines do wonders for the little half-pint Wranglers; I suppose it would be wonderful if it did half as much for my, twice as heavy Bronco. In so far as the MC or booster leaking, I do have a minute amount of fluid spotting around the firewall area, but not enough to be alarmed about. I figure it would take a sizable amount for me to start feeling it in the pedal and I have been keeping an eye on the fluid level, just to be safe. I DO need to get a nice bleed kit and learn, that is one thing I'm lacking. Lastly, I think I would start with a complete flush - it seems to hit several simple, problematic areas in one fell swoop.

I appreciate all your comments! Thank you all - if i have any further issues, I'll certainly post em!
 

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Only do the 1 ton MC if you're doing the T-bird caliper upgrade as well. The 1 ton MC on 1/2 ton brakes will have a better pedal feel, but will actually produce less braking force.

At an absolute minimum do the 350 wheel cylinders, it'll help some but your brakes will be worse than they should be. (of course they may be better than they are now, but not as good as when the truck was new- YMMV)

Justin
 

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While doing all this work go ahead and use the synthitic (spelling) brake fluid. It will not absorab moristure like standard fluid does and also will help keep the parts rusting on the inside and keeps a fermer brake pedal due to the inability to adsorab moister.

I have been useing it for several years now. I have noticed when I do any brake work where I have to bleed the brakes the fluid comes out much cleaner than before(not milky or rusty looking).

Just my experince and thought I would pass it along. Good luck.
 
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